Tag: AI

AI use cases that are shifting the higher ed landscape

“Imagine if universities could determine a student’s success or failure outcome before granting them admissions. Well, it’s not as far-fetched as one might think”

As the world of EdTech buzzes with new AI-powered developments, Ashish Fernando, the Founder and CEO of iSchoolConnect, talks about the effect of AI in student engagement, classroom education, student retention, and more.

AI in the higher education sector has been steadily increasing and spanning a broad swath of uses ranging from chatbots to augmented reality and more. Here are six groundbreaking technologies that I think, will change the face of education technology.

  1. Conversational AI for student engagement

Conversational AI isn’t simply limited to Alexa, Siri, Facebook, Google, and similar industries anymore. Universities worldwide are turning to chatbots as a means of student engagement and application management.

The conversational assistants use advanced natural language processing to function seamlessly and help students with information about the university campus, academics, student life, and more. From Georgia Tech’s ‘Jill Watson’ to New York University’s ‘BobCat’, the presence of AI in education technology is evident and the universities are certainly keeping up.

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Could AI uncover the secrets of a student’s success or failure?

“If this practice was rolled out more widely, the information would alert universities to who is at risk”

AI could soon be helping universities spot students who are struggling early so they can better support them and prevent them from dropping out, says Fred Singer, CEO of platform Echo360.

Imagine you’re a lecturer in the early days of teaching a large group of first and second-year students. You’re still getting to know your audience, but there aren’t many questions coming from the room, making it hard to confirm students’ understanding of the topics being covered.

You’re confident about the quality of your lecture, but questions linger.

Are some students struggling silently due to a limited grasp of English? Does the lack of questions indicate confusion rather than comprehension? Are students opting out of group discussions because they’re shy or because they don’t understand the concepts being debated?

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