Tag: Employability

The prominence of non-STEM courses in the US

“The US offers a unique dual degree program that allows students to undertake two subjects of varied fields”

A recent study by the World Economic Forum revealed that creativity, originality and emotional intelligence are among the top 10 in-demand skills in 2023. And what’s interesting is that except for two, all are non-STEM skills, which means they do not fall under the purview of Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics.

While researching the gradual shift towards non-STEM fields, I came across the McKinsey Global Institute trends report, which stated how the need for job skills will change between now and 2030. It emphasises on the demand for a person’s interpersonal skills, such as communication, empathy, and creativity. The report also states that the employees’ core performance areas are changing due to technological breakthroughs like automation and artificial intelligence.

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Why would any higher education institution treat international students differently in terms of graduate employability?

“I am truly shocked at the suggestion that any institution would, should or could differentiate between home and international students, reducing tailored support solely because of status”

I have worked in the higher education sector for over 25 years at a senior level, so it takes a lot to take my breath away, but the joint report published today by HEPI and Kaplan – Paying More for Less?: Careers and Employability Support for International Students – has achieved exactly that, says Paul Marshall, Pro-Vice-Chancellor (Careers and Enterprise) at University of East London.

The authors strongly question whether the sector has the capacity, resource and, in some cases, the will to meet the career aspiration of international students.

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Choose your words wisely: why study abroad needs to speak the language of employment

“Without this type of research as a foundation to measure the value of study abroad on careers, there is no basis to argue its place”

By Carrie Rackers Cunningham, director of institutional research at IES Abroad, makes the case for collecting more hard data on the link between study abroad and employability, to help practitioners speak the language of employment.

What do employers look for? We know the list: interpersonal communication, ability to work in a team, make decisions, solve problems, etc.
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