Category: Uncategorized

Why would any higher education institution treat international students differently in terms of graduate employability?

“I am truly shocked at the suggestion that any institution would, should or could differentiate between home and international students, reducing tailored support solely because of status”

I have worked in the higher education sector for over 25 years at a senior level, so it takes a lot to take my breath away, but the joint report published today by HEPI and Kaplan – Paying More for Less?: Careers and Employability Support for International Students – has achieved exactly that, says Paul Marshall, Pro-Vice-Chancellor (Careers and Enterprise) at University of East London.

The authors strongly question whether the sector has the capacity, resource and, in some cases, the will to meet the career aspiration of international students.

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Action on the data skills gap can’t wait until next term

“Data is often spoken of as the new water, so to effectively tap it we need to develop a generation of data prospectors”

As thoughts inevitably turn to summer vacations (global pandemic allowing, of course), the data skills gap might not be something keeping UK university professionals and leaders awake at night.

But with a still box-fresh National Data Strategy (NDS) in place and the government signalling an ambition for data to drive “anew era of growth”, it’s an issue that shouldn’t simply be pushed to the new term’s ‘to do’ list.

There’s a growing concern that a data ‘skills gap’ could turn into a ‘skills crisis’, both for the UK but also globally.

And with universities operating in a competitive international market, the provision of data skills modules within degree courses will increasingly inform decision-making of overseas students – and their parents and sponsors. Or Lenchner, CEO of Bright Data, explains.

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How to support international students during a pandemic

“Showing empathy makes the whole consulting process smoother for the student”

Rather than having a massive overhaul on your current working habits, just making small changes can go a long way in terms of international student recruitment. What benefits can we offer our international students during this trying time? UK-based Fulbright Education CEO Afsana Ahmed explains.

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Covid-19: intl students’ views on institutional responses

“International students in Germany were most likely to be satisfied with the online learning experience”

While the constantly evolving Covid-19 situation makes it difficult to predict, several studies have shown that students are more likely to delay rather than cancel study abroad plans and it is predicted that demand for study abroad will surge as the pandemic subsides, writes Kyla Steenhart, director of i-graduate New Zealand.

It has also been suggested that there will be a shift in market share post-Covid due to countries’ handling of the crisis.

A recent article by i-graduate drawing on data from a global survey of over 24,000 students in eleven countries looked at governmental responses to Covid-19 alongside students’ satisfaction with their institution’s response by country.

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International student study struggles during Covid-19

“For international students, extra tools… can help balance out their unique challenges “

Many international students taking classes in the US were forced to return to their home countries and take online classes as universities took measures to contain the virus on campuses, writes Tutor Portland founder Eric M. Earle. Online classes allowed international students to continue their education but not without interruption.

As the US continues to grapple with the worst of the pandemic, there are challenges international students will encounter when they return home mid-semester.

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The PIE stands in solidarity with the George Floyd movement and Black Lives Matter

“Within our own industry more can be done and we should all try to broaden access where we can”

 

The PIE stands with all activists advocating for change in light of the appallingly brutal murder of George Floyd in the USA.

Systems need to change – justice systems, education systems, arbitration systems, employment structures – to try and ensure greater equality and opportunity in our world.

International education can help achieve this although within our own industry, more can be done and we should all try to broaden access where we can.

The PIE is proud that Andrew Gordon of Diversity Abroad won our PIEoneer Award in 2019 for Outstanding Contribution to the industry and to support the #StudyAbroadStrong movement.

We need to be bold and unafraid to start dialogues around discrimination: how to be aware of it and then eliminate it.

We will endeavour to remember our responsibility to level up opportunities within the global education sector and ensure our news coverage shines a light on efforts to ensure equality, diversity and solidarity in our own industry.

The three commandments of international education partnerships

“Finding the right partners isn’t easy, and it’s important to be particular in your search for the right network and connections”

Mark Fletcher is co-founder and CEO of edtech company Cohort Go. In this blog, he explores the importance of creating strong partnerships to keep the international education industry growing and moving forward.

 Partnerships are critical to international education. Whether it’s an international student seeking advice from an education agent, or a university working with a payments provider to facilitate student tuition payments – the international education community is built on a solid foundation of partnerships.

Collaborating with the right partners is vital if you are going to deliver overall success – not just in your business, but to the sector as a whole. Here are three things I’ve learned to help form successful partnerships in international education.

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New Graduate Occupation List in Australia is likely to increase WA university applications

“”The correlation between international student enrolments and tourism numbers with the eligibility pathways for permanent residence is clear as day”

The Western Australian labor government has quickly recognised the mistake it made in 2017 when it de facto closed its immigration program to skilled migrants immediately after winning the 2017 election. 

In the ensuing months, international student enrolments at WA universities dropped significantly – 7% or 1403 enrolments in the 2018 financial year alone, against a backdrop of 11% growth nationally. That represents an 18% negative swing in WA against the national average. In simple terms, a disaster for the Western Australian education and tourism industries.

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Looking Stateside: US College Admissions for International Students

In 2017, over 1 million international students were enrolled in U.S. schools. To join that group, it’s important for students to understand the admissions process for international students when applying to U.S. colleges because it can be lengthier than what domestic student applicants go through.

What is the Common Application?

The Common Application is a single application that can be submitted to multiple institutions. If several of the colleges you’re applying to accept the Common Application, consider filling it out to save time. The Common Application includes some essay questions that colleges use for admissions purposes. You’ll want to double check with each college that there aren’t additional supplemental essays to provide for your admissions application.

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Brexit and the Strengthening of US Partnerships

“US institutions will do well to pay close attention to the final negotiations of Brexit in early 2019”

The much anticipated  September report of the Migration Advisory Committee (MAC) has largely confirmed everyone’s expectations: yes, foreign students are an unalloyed benefit to the UK, but, no, not all obstacles will be removed to promote their arrival.

It’s a bit of a contradiction, but one that might be explained by the committee being appointed and answerable to the Home Office. With its eyes on the Brexit horizon, the committee admits it sees “no strong arguments for discriminating in favor of EU Students.”
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